Frequent question: What is the Equal Protection Clause Philippines?

The equal protection of the law clause is against undue favor and individual or class privilege, as well as hostile discrimination or the oppression of inequality. It is not intended to prohibit legislation which is limited either in the object to which it is directed or by territory within which it is to operate.

What is the Equal Protection Clause What was it meant to do?

Equal Protection refers to the idea that a governmental body may not deny people equal protection of its governing laws. The governing body state must treat an individual in the same manner as others in similar conditions and circumstances.

What is the Equal Protection Clause and what does it guarantee?

Equal protection, in United States law, the constitutional guarantee that no person or group will be denied the protection under the law that is enjoyed by similar persons or groups. In other words, persons similarly situated must be similarly treated.

What is an example of Equal Protection Clause?

For example, a state may not prohibit inter-racial marriages, or deny child custody to a couple because they are of different races. Also, as mentioned above, any laws requiring segregation of the races will be held unconstitutional.

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What is the 14th Amendment in simple terms?

The 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, ratified in 1868, granted citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States—including former enslaved people—and guaranteed all citizens “equal protection of the laws.” One of three amendments passed during the Reconstruction era to abolish slavery and …

Who does the 14th Amendment apply to?

Passed by the Senate on June 8, 1866, and ratified two years later, on July 9, 1868, the Fourteenth Amendment granted citizenship to all persons “born or naturalized in the United States,” including formerly enslaved people, and provided all citizens with “equal protection under the laws,” extending the provisions of …

What are the 3 levels of scrutiny?

There are three judicial review tests: the rational basis test, the intermediate scrutiny test, and the strict scrutiny test. The intermediate scrutiny test and the strict scrutiny test are considered more stringent than the rational basis test.

What are the most important Supreme Court cases?

Landmark United States Supreme Court Cases

  • Marbury v. Madison (1803) …
  • McCulloch v. Maryland (1819) …
  • Gibbons v. Ogden (1824) …
  • Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857) …
  • Schenck v. United States (1919) …
  • Brown v. Board of Education (1954) …
  • Gideon v. Wainwright (1963) …
  • Miranda v. Arizona (1966)

How can the 14th Amendment be violated?

Washington , the U.S. Supreme Court rules that the due process clause of the 14th Amendment (which guarantees the right to a fair hearing that follows the rules) is violated when a state law fails to explain exactly what conduct is prohibited.

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What is the difference between due process and equal protection?

Substantive due process protects criminal defendants from unreasonable government intrusion on their substantive constitutional rights. … The equal protection clause prevents the state government from enacting criminal laws that arbitrarily discriminate.