What is the best example of Protected Health Information PHI quizlet?

Health information such as diagnoses, treatment information, medical test results, and prescription information are considered protected health information under HIPAA, as are national identification numbers and demographic information such as birth dates, gender, ethnicity, and contact and emergency contact …

Which of the following does protected health information PHI include quizlet?

Protected Health Information – individually identifiable health information that is transmitted by electronic media, maintained in any electronic medium, or maintained in any other form or medium. … The health records, billing records, and various claims records that are used to make decisions about an individual.

Which of the following is an example of a patients protected health information?

PHI is health information in any form, including physical records, electronic records, or spoken information. Therefore, PHI includes health records, health histories, lab test results, and medical bills. Essentially, all health information is considered PHI when it includes individual identifiers.

Which of the following does protected health information PHI include?

Protected health information includes all individually identifiable health information, including demographic data, medical histories, test results, insurance information, and other information used to identify a patient or provide healthcare services or healthcare coverage.

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What is PHI protected health information quizlet?

PHI(Protected Health Information)- All individual identifiable health information and other information on treatment or care that is transmitted or maintained in any form or medium(electronic, paper, oral.

Which of the following information is PHI?

PHI stands for Protected Health Information, which is any information that is related to the health status of an individual. This can include the provision of health care, medical record and/or payment for the treatment of a particular patient and can be linked to him or her.

What are examples of Hipaa violations?

What Are Some Common HIPAA Violations?

  • Stolen/lost laptop.
  • Stolen/lost smart phone.
  • Stolen/lost USB device.
  • Malware incident.
  • Ransomware attack.
  • Hacking.
  • Business associate breach.
  • EHR breach.

What is not considered protected health information?

Examples of health data that is not considered PHI: Number of steps in a pedometer. Number of calories burned. Blood sugar readings w/out personally identifiable user information (PII) (such as an account or user name)

Which of the following is an example of health information?

Health information is the data related to a person’s medical history, including symptoms, diagnoses, procedures, and outcomes. A health record includes information such as: a patient’s history, lab results, X-rays, clinical information, demographic information, and notes.

Is patient name alone considered PHI?

For example, patient name or email alone can be considered PHI if it is in any way associated with a health condition or treatment—such as in a marketing email coming from your practice advertising a specific treatment to a group of individuals who were selected to receive the email based on their medical history.

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When can you use or disclose protected health information?

Covered entities may disclose protected health information that they believe is necessary to prevent or lessen a serious and imminent threat to a person or the public, when such disclosure is made to someone they believe can prevent or lessen the threat (including the target of the threat).

When can you use or disclose PHI?

In general, a covered entity may only use or disclose PHI if either: (1) the HIPAA Privacy Rule specifically permits or requires it; or (2) the individual who is the subject of the information gives authorization in writing. We note that this blog only discusses HIPAA; other federal or state privacy laws may apply.