Who should you talk to if you have a safeguarding concern about a child?

Who should you talk to if you have a concern about a child?

If the child is not in immediate danger, you have a choice about who to speak to because all adults share responsibility for keeping children safe. You can contact the police on 101. You can speak to someone you already know, such as your own health visitor, doctor, child’s teacher or nursery worker.

Who should you approach if a safeguarding concern arises?

Local authorities, with the help of other organisations as appropriate, have a duty to make enquiries under section 47 of the Children Act 1989 if they have reasonable cause to suspect that a child is suffering, or is likely to suffer, significant harm.

Who should your manager contact if you have concerns about a child at risk?

If a child is in immediate danger or is at risk of serious significant harm, the practitioner should contact the Police (999) and refer to MASH as soon as possible. For more information, see Action Following Referral of Safeguarding Concerns Procedure, Immediate Protection.

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What to do if you have a safeguarding concern about a child?

Raising a concern

  1. Tell the safeguarding lead of your organisation immediately with as much clear detail as you are able.
  2. If there is an immediate risk of harm or an emergency situation, call 999 for the police immediately and then contact Social Services.

What are the 4 types of child neglect?

Do You Know About the 4 Types of Child Neglect?

  • What is Neglect? …
  • Types of Child Neglect.
  • Physical Neglect. …
  • Educational Neglect. …
  • Emotional Neglect. …
  • Medical Neglect. …
  • What You Can Do to Help.

How do I report a safeguarding concern?

Make a report of what you‘ve seen and any evidence that would support your claim, including time and date. Do this in line with your educational organisation’s child protection policy. Report what you have seen to a superior or a designated safeguarding lead (DSL) who will then take the issue further if they see fit.

What happens if a safeguarding is raised against you?

Where the allegation leads to the involvement of children’s social care and/or the police, the LADO will canvass their views on suspension and let your employer know. However, only your employer has the power to suspend you and they cannot be required to do so by a local authority or police.

What are the 5 main safeguarding issues?

Common safeguarding issues

  • Maladministration of medication.
  • Pressure sores.
  • Falls.
  • Rough treatment, being rushed, shouted at or ignored.
  • Poor nutritional care.
  • Lack of social inclusion.
  • Institutionalised care.
  • Physical abuse between residents.

When can you raise a safeguarding concern without consent?

You have a legal and ethical duty to raise concerns if you suspect a vulnerable adult patient is being abused or neglected. Involve patients in decisions about their care. You can disclose information to protect the patient or others from harm.

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What is a child safeguarding concern?

Child safeguarding is the responsibility that organisations have to make sure their staff, operations, and programmes do no harm to children, that is that they do not expose children to the risk of harm and abuse, and that any concerns the organisation has about children’s safety within the communities in which they …

What is the local protocol for child protection?

Local Child Protection Protocols and Procedures are agreed by the MSCP and local agencies, on the advice of the MSCP Policy Sub Group and the Promote and Protect Young People Sub Group. The MSCP has agreed definitions for ‘strategy’, ‘policy’, ‘protocol’ and ‘procedure’.

Do you need to be absolutely sure that a child is at risk of significant harm before you take action?

Although there is no absolute criteria for determining whether or not harm is “significant”, local authorities such as social services, police, education and health agencies work with family members to assess the child, and a decision is made based on their professional judgement using the gathered evidence.