When protected health information PHI is transmitted electronically?

Electronic protected health information or ePHI is defined in HIPAA regulation as any protected health information (PHI) that is created, stored, transmitted, or received in any electronic format or media. HIPAA regulation states that ePHI includes any of 18 distinct demographics that can be used to identify a patient.

What is electronic PHI ePHI?

Electronic protected health information (ePHI) is protected health information (PHI) that is produced, saved, transferred or received in an electronic form. … This includes identifying and protecting against reasonably anticipated threats to the security or integrity of the information.

How is PHI transmitted?

transmitted by electronic media; maintained in electronic media; or. transmitted or maintained in any other form or medium (includes paper and oral communication).

What protects confidentiality and PHI stored on or transmitted through a computer network or Internet?

The HIPAA security standards apply to protected health information (PHI) that is either stored or transmitted electronically.

What are the electronic requirements of HIPAA?

General Rules

  • Ensure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of all e-PHI they create, receive, maintain or transmit;
  • Identify and protect against reasonably anticipated threats to the security or integrity of the information;
  • Protect against reasonably anticipated, impermissible uses or disclosures; and.
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What is the difference between ePHI and PHI?

Under HIPAA, any information that can be used to identify a patient is considered Protected Health Information (PHI). PHI in electronic form — such as a digital copy of a medical report — is electronic PHI, or ePHI. … Anything related to health, treatment or billing that could identify a patient is PHI.

Is the date a person died PHI?

The HIPAA Privacy Rule protects the individually identifiable health information about a decedent for 50 years following the date of death of the individual.

What is not considered as PHI?

PHI only relates to information on patients or health plan members. It does not include information contained in educational and employment records, that includes health information maintained by a HIPAA covered entity in its capacity as an employer.

When can you use or disclose PHI?

In general, a covered entity may only use or disclose PHI if either: (1) the HIPAA Privacy Rule specifically permits or requires it; or (2) the individual who is the subject of the information gives authorization in writing. We note that this blog only discusses HIPAA; other federal or state privacy laws may apply.

What are the three types of Hipaa violations?

Most Common HIPAA Violation Examples

  • 1) Lack of Encryption. …
  • 2) Getting Hacked OR Phished. …
  • 3) Unauthorized Access. …
  • 4) Loss or Theft of Devices. …
  • 5) Sharing Information. …
  • 6) Disposal of PHI. …
  • 7) Accessing PHI from Unsecured Location.

How do you protect PHI data?

Examples of how to keep PHI secure:

  1. If PHI is in a place where patients or others can see it, cover or move it.
  2. If you work with PHI on your desk or on a computer, make sure no one can walk up behind you without knowing it.
  3. When PHI is not in use, store it in a locking office or a locking file cabinet.
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What are the four main rules of HIPAA?

There are four key aspects of HIPAA that directly concern patients. They are the privacy of health data, security of health data, notifications of healthcare data breaches, and patient rights over their own healthcare data.

What is exempt from the HIPAA security Rule?

Question 4 – Which of the following are EXEMPT from the HIPAA Security Rule? Large health plans. Hospitals. Answer: Covered Entities or Business Associates that do not create, receive, maintain, or transmit ePHI. Business Associates.

What is the HIPAA rule?

The HIPAA Privacy Rule establishes national standards to protect individuals’ medical records and other personal health information and applies to health plans, health care clearinghouses, and those health care providers that conduct certain health care transactions electronically.